Events

artwork in gallery

Events

To limit the spread of COVID-19, most events are being held remotely. If you have questions about a specific event, please contact the event organizer or see the event description in the UO Calendar.

There is always something happening in the College of Design. Join us for art exhibits, guest lectures, conferences, and research symposia. Most of these are free and open to the public. You can join our email list to receive our Upcoming Events weekly announcement and stay in the know about the latest happenings.

Apr 16
LOOK. Listen. Learn. Act.12:00 a.m.

Every year, the JSMA partners with the University of Oregon’s Common Reading—campuswide programming around a shared book and its themes—to organize a Common...
January 27–June 14

Every year, the JSMA partners with the University of Oregon’s Common Reading—campuswide programming around a shared book and its themes—to organize a Common Seeing exhibition that explores and expands on the Common Reading through visual art. The 2020-21 novel is This is My America by UO Assistant Vice Provost for Advising, Kimberly Johnson. The Common Reading’s charge of Listen. Learn. Act. incorporates different bodies of work across multiple platforms, focusing on Blackness, Black experience, and dismantling racism. The works on view in this year’s Common Seeing, on loan from the collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer, are by Black American artists Hank Willis Thomas (American, b. 1976) and Alison Saar (American, b. 1956). Their art compels us to look, listen, learn, and act.

The JSMA believes that art can move people to change. As an academic art museum, it is critical for us to listen, learn, and act in order to build trust and understanding. We are committed to the advancement of anti-racism in museum culture and diverse and equitable approaches in our work. The JSMA’s exhibitions and public programs strive to amplify multiple perspectives, experiences, and voices. LOOK. Listen. Learn. Act. is generously made possible by the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation.

 

Image: Alison Saar (American, b. 1956). Sorrow’s Kitchen (detail), 2020. Wood, tin, acrylics, spray tar, ceiling tin and linoleum, 28 x 12 x 10 in. Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer (Photo Credit: L.A. Louver).  

 

Apr 16
Metamorphosis: Visualizing the Music of Paul Hindemith12:00 a.m.

The JSMA and Eugene Symphony Association celebrate an innovative collaboration with four Oregon visual artists in response to Paul Hindemith (1895-1963)’s orchestral...
March 6–June 14

The JSMA and Eugene Symphony Association celebrate an innovative collaboration with four Oregon visual artists in response to Paul Hindemith (1895-1963)’s orchestral masterpiece Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Weber. Over the past year, while working closely with Eugene Symphony Music Director and Conductor Francesco Lecce-Chong, Mika Aono, Anna Fidler, Andrew Myers, and Julia Oldham created new works in printmaking, painting, drawing, and animation. Each commissioned artist was inspired by the virtuosity, imagination, experimentation, and humor inherent in Hindemith’s most popular work. Four corresponding videos, three of which were created by JSMA design services manager Mike Bragg, will show how the evolution of each artist’s work was informed by the themes in one movement from the music. At a later date, the Eugene Symphony’s “Beethoven’s Fifth” performance at the Hult Center for the Performing Arts will explore how music and art bring us closer together with a program that includes Hindemith’s Symphonic Metamorphosis, accompanied by projections of these videos, making visible the stages of creation in each artist’s work. Concert details will be made available at eugenesymphony.org/events.

 

Image: Andrew Myers. Detail from Flight of the Hindemith Marbled Murrelet, 2020. Water based mixed media on paper and cut paper, 120 x 204 inches. (installation). Courtesy of Andrew Myers.

Apr 16
Lost/Found: Work by Advanced Printmaking Students8:00 a.m.

This exhibition manifests the Printmaking area in the College of Design, exhibiting works by undergraduate students Lily Cronn, Benjamin Gregg, Laneate Vang, and graduate student...
March 28–May 22
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Adell McMillan Gallery

This exhibition manifests the Printmaking area in the College of Design, exhibiting works by undergraduate students Lily Cronn, Benjamin Gregg, Laneate Vang, and graduate student Noelle Herceg. Some selected works in Letterpress are also included. Ranging from traditional techniques of relief, intaglio, screenprint, letterpress, to unique and unconventional works on paper and textiles, this exhibition encompasses the diversity of mark that printmaking can achieve.

 

*UO ID required to visit the gallery in person. Virtual artist talk / tour will be available via Visual Arts Team Instagram (@uovisualarts) and Facebook (@visualartsteam).*

Apr 17
Tangible: Expanded Materiality and Art History10:00 a.m.

17th Annual University of Oregon Graduate Symposium in the History of Art & Architecture. Keynote Lecture 4:30 p.m. PST see full schedule: https://bit.ly/3t65T0z Dr....
April 17 10:00 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

17th Annual University of Oregon Graduate Symposium in the History of Art & Architecture.

Keynote Lecture
4:30 p.m. PST

see full schedule: https://bit.ly/3t65T0z

Dr. Heather Shirey and
Dr. David Todd Lawrence
University of St. Thomas

Zoom Meeting ID: 910 6385 6747
Passcode: UOAHSA

Apr 17
Garrick Imatani: Monologuenoon

UO Center for Art Research Exhibition Garrick Imatani: Monologue April 3 to May 1, 2021 at Eugene Contemporary Art's gallery ANTI-AESTHETIC, 245 W. 8th...
April 3–May 1
, ANTI-AESTHETIC

UO Center for Art Research Exhibition

Garrick Imatani: Monologue
April 3 to May 1, 2021 at Eugene Contemporary Art's gallery ANTI-AESTHETIC, 245 W. 8th Ave in Eugene, Oregon
Gallery hours: Saturdays & Sundays from noon- 4:00 p.m. by appointment    

Garrick Imatani’s project Monologue examines the forces that inform and shape perceptions of non-dominant cultural identities. Through an examination of his own Japanese cultural heritage, Imatani creates objects and iconographies that use direct observation or online engagement to setup an alternative punchline. With his project he questions the aesthetics of assimilation and authenticity, as well as the contemporary and conceptual which continue to situate works within co-opted art historical references. The objects and prints comprising this installation question both the dominant canon and inclusionary and equity constructs – first enforced by colonialist aesthetics and further perpetuated within institutional frameworks and scholarship. In creating interactive objects layered with humorous imagery, Imatani seeks to diffuse the notion of an intangible “essence” of a culture—inviting instead a de-centralized, intricate and multifaceted reading of cultural properties beyond one’s own.

Garrick Imatani is an artist who uses performance, functional objects, or interaction to draw attention to one’s embodied subjectivity. Working in sculpture, photography, video and installation, recent projects focus on reimagining racialized historical erasures into more believable and inspired futures. Past works have included collaborating with illegally-surveilled activists to readjust city archives, re-enacting labor on the transcontinental railroad, and working with the Grand Ronde tribe to replicate their sacred meteorite held in the American Museum of Natural History.

His work has been exhibited at the Blaffer Art Museum (Houston), Triumph Gallery (Moscow), Art in General (NYC), Disjecta Contemporary Art Center (Portland, OR), Chachalu Museum (Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, OR), Art, Design and Architecture Museum at UC Santa Barbara, and Portland Museum of Art (ME), among others. He has received grant support from The Andy Warhol Foundation, Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, The Ford Family Foundation, Oregon Arts Commission, Maine Arts Commission, Regional Arts & Culture Council and Oregon Percent for Art. Imatani holds an MFA from Columbia University, NY and resides in Portland, OR where he is an Associate Professor and Chair of Foundation at Pacific Northwest College of Art.

This exhibition is organized as part of Dismantling the House, a series of public programs and exhibitions curated by Yaelle S. Amir, CFAR’s 2020-21 Curator-in-Residence. Programs are made possible by the Ford Family Foundation.

Apr 18
Making After Melancholia: A Discussion Between Garrick Imatani, Lynn Yarne and Lu Yimnoon

UO Center for Art Research Discourse Free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here. In conjunction with Garrick Imatani’s...
April 18 noon

UO Center for Art Research Discourse

Free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here.

In conjunction with Garrick Imatani’s exhibition Monologue at Eugene Contemporary Art’s gallery space ANTI-AESTHETIC, the Center for Art Research at the University of Oregon will host a conversation between artists Imatani (Portland), Lynn Yarne (Portland) and Lu Yim (New York) reflecting on the cultural representation of their Asian American identity. The dialogue will address the artists’ perception of the nuanced ways in which their identity figures into their work—looking at compounded layers of representation, cultural expectation vs. lived experience, and the futurist contexts in which their work as Asian American makers might be seen.

Garrick Imatani is an artist who uses performance, functional objects, or interaction to draw attention to one’s embodied subjectivity. Working in sculpture, photography, video and installation, recent projects focus on reimagining racialized historical erasures into more believable and inspired futures. Past works have included collaborating with illegally-surveilled activists to readjust city archives, re-enacting labor on the transcontinental railroad, and working with the Grand Ronde tribe to replicate their sacred meteorite held in the American Museum of Natural History. His work has been exhibited at the Blaffer Art Museum (Houston), Triumph Gallery (Moscow), Art in General (NYC), Disjecta Contemporary Art Center (Portland, OR), Chachalu Museum (Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, OR), Art, Design and Architecture Museum at UC Santa Barbara, and Portland Museum of Art (ME), among others. He has received grant support from The Andy Warhol Foundation, Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, The Ford Family Foundation, Oregon Arts Commission, Maine Arts Commission, Regional Arts & Culture Council and Oregon Percent for Art. Imatani holds an MFA from Columbia University, NY and resides in Portland, OR where he is an Associate Professor and Chair of Foundation at Pacific Northwest College of Art.

Lynn Yarne is an artist and educator from Portland, Oregon. She works within animation and collage to address collective memory, generational narratives, histories and space. A fourth generation Chinese and Japanese American, her current work explores themes of displacement and loss, resilience and community, particularly within Old Town Portland. She is curious about participatory works, magic, and rejuvenation. 

Lu Yim is a movement based artist and teacher. Yim is a co-organizer of Physical Education (PE) and Pidzn Club, two artist-for-artist run groups based in Portland, OR. Currently they are an Artist-in-Residence at Center for Performance Research (Brooklyn, NY).

This dialogue is organized as part of Dismantling the House, a series of public programs and exhibitions curated by Yaelle S. Amir, CFAR’s 2020-21 Curator-in-Residence. Programs are made possible by the Ford Family Foundation.

Apr 19
"amalgamenagerie"9:00 a.m.

New work by Tyler Stoll, Erin Langley, and Noelle Herceg   *Note: Due to COVID-19 restrictions, UO ID cards or building access codes are required to gain entry to these...
April 19–22
Lawrence Hall, LaVerne Krause Gallery

New work by Tyler Stoll, Erin Langley, and Noelle Herceg

 

*Note: Due to COVID-19 restrictions, UO ID cards or building access codes are required to gain entry to these exhibitions.*

Apr 19
"How We Got Here: Sketches versus Finals in Comic Art"9:00 a.m.

New work by Rose Gibian. *Note: Due to COVID-19 restrictions, UO ID cards or building access codes are required to gain entry to these exhibitions.*
April 19–22
Lawrence Hall, Foyer Gallery

New work by Rose Gibian.

*Note: Due to COVID-19 restrictions, UO ID cards or building access codes are required to gain entry to these exhibitions.*

Apr 19
"Yellow Kid"9:00 a.m.

Lily Wai Brennan introduces a new character in her work that abstracts her self-identification with race. This show features works surrounding experiences with Asian American hate...
April 19–22
Ceramics Building, Washburn Gallery

Lily Wai Brennan introduces a new character in her work that abstracts her self-identification with race. This show features works surrounding experiences with Asian American hate crimes from a personal perspective.

 





*Note: Due to COVID-19 restrictions, UO ID cards or building access codes are required to gain entry to these exhibitions.*




Apr 19
Elihu Katz: "How Did Mass Become Network?"9:00 a.m.

Elihu Katz is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, as well as Distinguished Trustee Professor of...
April 19 9:00 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Elihu Katz is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, as well as Distinguished Trustee Professor of Communication and Sociology at the Annenberg School of Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Katz is a sociologist and media scientist who is known for his lifetime of contributions to the field of mass communication research, especially media effects. His first book, co-authored with his mentor Paul Lazarsfeld, was Personal Influence: The Part Played by People in the Flow of Mass Communication (Routledge, 1955), an attempt to observe the flow of influence at the intersections of mass and interpersonal communication. It is cited extensively as an influential work in the development of the two-step flow model of communication. Katz is a recipient of the McLuhan Teleglobe Canada Award (UNESCO), the Burda Prize (in media res), and the Israel Prize for social sciences. He is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Co-presented with Yonatan Fialkoff, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Free registration required.

 

Series Overview

What is Communication? (2021) will investigate instantiations and permutations of communication via models of exchange, modes of inquiry, and meanings of community. While communication has been conceptualized as models of transportation, transmission, and ritual, communication is also characterized by modes of sharing, imparting, connecting, and participating. These characteristics can contribute to democracy, as well as facilitating the commons and community/fellowship. This year marks the sixth collaboration with scholars from the natural sciences, social sciences and arts.

Please see whatis.uoregon.edu for more details and other featured keynotes.

The What is…? Speaker Series is sponsored by the Knight Chair in Communication Research, UO Women in Graduate Science, the Oregon Humanities Center, New Media and Culture Program, and the Department of Philosophy. Additional gratitude to our supporters.

Apr 21
School of Architecture and Environment Graduate Programs Virtual Information Session9:30 a.m.

Virtual information session to provide further details on the Graduate Programs within the School of Architecture and Environment (Historic Preservation, Interior...
February 16–June 3

Virtual information session to provide further details on the Graduate Programs within the School of Architecture and Environment (Historic Preservation, Interior Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Architecture) and their application process at both our Eugene and Portland campuses.

Please register here: Information Session Registration

Once individuals have registered, a link to the virtual session will be sent out as a confirmation a couple of days before the event.

For futher information, please contact, Jessica Wu at jwu21@uoregon.edu.

Apr 22
H. Leslie Steeves: "Power, Voice & Influence Through ICTs: Reflections on Digital Inequalities in the Global South"noon

H. Leslie Steeves is Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor in the School of Journalism and Communication at the University of Oregon. Her research addresses...
April 22 noon–1:00 p.m.

H. Leslie Steeves is Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor in the School of Journalism and Communication at the University of Oregon. Her research addresses overlapping questions concerning ICT4D (information and communication technologies for development) particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, gender and communication, and entertainment and tourism representations of Africa. She is the recipient of the UO’s Martin Luther King Jr. Award for promoting cultural diversity and social justice on campus and the International Communication Association’s Teresa Award for the Advancement of Feminist Scholarship. Steeves is affiliated faculty in the African Studies Program, has received two Fulbright Scholar grants for teaching and research in Kenya and Ghana, and directs an annual study-abroad program in collaboration with the University of Ghana.

Co-presented with Janet D. Kwami, Furman University, South Carolina.

Free registration required.

 

Series Overview

What is Communication? (2021) will investigate instantiations and permutations of communication via models of exchange, modes of inquiry, and meanings of community. While communication has been conceptualized as models of transportation, transmission, and ritual communication is also characterized by modes of sharing, imparting, connecting, and participating. These characteristics can contribute to democracy, as well as facilitating the commons and community/fellowship. This year marks the sixth collaboration with scholars from the natural sciences, social sciences and arts.

Please see whatis.uoregon.edu for more details and other featured keynotes.

The What is…? Speaker Series is sponsored by the Knight Chair in Communication Research, UO Women in Graduate Science, the Oregon Humanities Center, New Media and Culture Program, and the Department of Philosophy. Additional gratitude to our supporters.

Apr 22
Rebecca Morris Artist Talk 4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research Rebecca Morris is an abstract painter whose work deeply investigates...
April 22 4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series
Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research

Rebecca Morris is an abstract painter whose work deeply investigates materials, form, processes, and outcomes. A showcase for her extensive arsenal of techniques and ideas, her ambitious large-scale canvases incorporate different manners of mark-making and inventively explore questions of frame dynamics and figure/ground illusions, often within a remarkably shallow pictorial space.

Rebecca Morris, b.1969 in Honolulu, Hawaii; lives in Los Angeles, California. BA, Smith College; MFA, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago; The Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. She is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of California, Los Angeles. Solo exhibitions include: Bortolami, NYC (2020); Blaffer Art Museum, Houston TX (2019); Mary Boone Gallery, NYC (2017); 356 S. Mission Rd, Los Angeles (2015); The Bonnefantenmuseum, The Netherlands (2014); Kunsthalle Lingen, Germany (2013); Galerie Barbara Weiss, Berlin (2017, 2013, 2009, 2006); Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago (2016, 2013); Harris Lieberman, New York (2012, 2010); The Renaissance Society, Chicago (2005); and Santa Monica Museum of Art (2003); forthcoming, ICALA, Los Angeles (2022). Group exhibitions include: Made in LA at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2016); Whitney Biennial, NY (2014); Kunstmuseum St. Gallen, Switzerland; The Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles; Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, OH; Victoria Miro Gallery, London; Sammlung Goetz, Munich; David Zwirner Gallery, NYC; Galerie nchst St. Stephan, Vienna, Austria; The Hessel Art Museum at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Gavin Browns Enterprise, NYC; The Pit, CA. Morris was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, Tiffany Foundation; The California Community Foundation; The City of Los Angeles Individual Artist Award; The Durfee Foundation; Art Matters; and the Illinois Arts Council.

The event is free and open to the public and live on Zoom - register here. The lecture will also livestream on the Department of Art Facebook.

Apr 23
McKeown Lecture with Diana Fernandez, Heterogeneous Futures: Design Thinking Alternatives for Anthropologically and Ecologically Diverse Landscapesnoon

  The Landscape Architecture Department is delighted to host Diana Fernandez ASLA as the Spring 2021 McKeown lecturer. This public talk will be open to all and take place...
April 23 noon–1:00 p.m.

 

The Landscape Architecture Department is delighted to host Diana Fernandez ASLA as the Spring 2021 McKeown lecturer. This public talk will be open to all and take place on Friday, April 23rd from 12-1PM PST via zoom.

"Heterogeneous Futures: Design Thinking Alternatives for Anthropologically and Ecologically Diverse Landscapes"

Building upon principles rooted in landscape ecology, landscape heterogeneity presents an opportunity to embrace the concept of difference to build resilient and community focused landscapes. This dialogue exposes the interconnected relationship between ecology and the anthropological sciences. From the design of a public landscape to commemorate Black culture, to increasing ecological complexity in urban and suburban systems through planting, landscape heterogeneity creates a platform for change within the doctrine and practice of designing landscapes.

 

Diana Fernandez Bio:

Diana is a proven thinker, collaborator and leader, who teams effortlessly with architects, planners, urban designers, ecologists and civil engineers on the design of equitable and sustainable places. Her experience spans a broad range of projects from planning to built work.

Diana provides critical thought and design leadership for our landscape and planning practice in the Urban Studio. She brings to each project—as well as a myriad corporate initiatives—strong critical thinking, a willingness to engage in thoughtful debate, and a commitment to quality. She leads and champions better equity and inclusion in our planning and built design practices from a landscape perspective.

Prior to joining Sasaki, Diana worked as a landscape architect and project designer in Philadelphia where she worked on urban and campus projects in the metro area. She writes and lectures in the discourses of landscape architecture, urban design, and equity. She holds a bachelor of science in landscape architecture from Temple University.

 

 

Topic: Spring 2021 McKeown Lecture featuring Diana Fernandez

Time: Apr 23, 2021 12:00 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

https://uoregon.zoom.us/j/92227287208

Apr 26
"Across the Threshold"9:00 a.m.

Across the Threshold: Comparing Aesthetic Experience in the Street and in the Gallery   Does being inside a gallery impact how we see art? Let's find out...
April 26–29
Ceramics Building, Washburn Gallery

Across the Threshold: Comparing Aesthetic Experience in the Street and in the Gallery

 

Does being inside a gallery impact how we see art? Let's find out together.

Enter, view a series of aesthetic objects, complete a brief (volunteer) survey, recieve results.

 

Honors College Thesis Exhibition by Noah Jordan

 





*Note: Due to COVID-19 restrictions, UO ID cards or building access codes are required to gain entry to these exhibitions.*




Apr 28
Art History, or a Walk in the Parknoon

HAA Colloquium talk with Visiting Assistant Professor Sonia de Laforcade. The Zoom link for the event is: https://uoregon.zoom.us/j/94555106807
April 28 noon

HAA Colloquium talk with Visiting Assistant Professor Sonia de Laforcade.

The Zoom link for the event is: https://uoregon.zoom.us/j/94555106807

Apr 30
School of Art + Design Career Futures Event10:00 a.m.

This annual event connects students with professionals who represent career paths in art, art and technology, and product design. Professionals will share their career-path...
April 30 10:00 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

This annual event connects students with professionals who represent career paths in art, art and technology, and product design. Professionals will share their career-path stories, talk about what inspires them in their chosen fields, and respond to questions from the discussion moderators.

In consideration of ongoing global health conditions, the 2021 Career Futures event will be entirely remote and will consist of three successive moderated panelist discussions followed by one-on-one portfolio review meetings. The review meetings will be reserved for majors in art, art and technology and product design and are limited in number. Links and instructions will be shared with Art + Design majors soon, and sign-up is first come/first served.

All participating professionals' brief bios are posted online now with ongoing updates.

Friday, April 30, 2021

10:00 – 11:30 am PT: Product Design Professionals Moderated Panel Discussion; register to attend


Becky Chierichetti, BFA ’16, Product Design
Sean Kelly, BFA ’11, Product Design
Katie Lee, BFA ’14, Product Design


 

12:00 – 1:30 pm PT: Art Professionals Moderated Panel Discussion; register to attend


Natalie Ball, BA ’05, Art and Ethnic Studies
Peter Happel Christian, MFA ’03, Art
Jenene Nagy, MFA ’04, Art


 

2:00 – 3:30 pm PT: Art & Technology Professionals Moderated Panel Discussion; register to attend


Carly Hagen, BFA ’17, Art & Technology
Nico Toll, BA ’14, Art & Technology
Mary Vertulfo, BFA ’18, Art & Technology


 

3:30 – 5:30 pm PT: For majors in the School of Art + Design, limited portfolio review appointments with Art, Art & Technology, and Product Design Professionals; sign-up links and instructions coming soon to students' uoregon.edu email.

May 4
Arts and Media Connect4:00 p.m.

Are you passionate about entertainment or the arts? Do you want to forge a career path in communications? Are you passionate about the arts, media, or entertainment? If so,...
May 4 4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Are you passionate about entertainment or the arts?

Do you want to forge a career path in communications?

Are you passionate about the arts, media, or entertainment? If so, then CONNECT with employers and alumni in communications, entertainment, the arts, and related fields to learn about career paths and get advice in a casual, fun “speed dating”-style networking event. Over the course of the event, you’ll have a chance to network with a new organization every 8 minutes! This event will take place on Zoom.  Register via Handshake!

 Still not sure what to expect at a Connect? Here’s help to prep:
Don't Just Network, CONNECT!: https://career.uoregon.edu/blog/don't-just-network-connect
Five Tips for Making Meaningful Connections at Virtual Networking Events: https://career.uoregon.edu/blog/five-tips-making-meaningful-connections-virtual-networking-events

 

May 5
Haseltine Lecture "Destroying the Big Mound"5:30 p.m.

In 1869, the so-called Big Mound of St. Louis was destroyed. But the destruction and desecration of this Indigenous monument did not end there. In this presentation, I trace the...
May 5 5:30 p.m.

In 1869, the so-called Big Mound of St. Louis was destroyed. But the destruction and desecration of this Indigenous monument did not end there. In this presentation, I trace the multiple destructions endured by the monument and the politics behind its memorialization. I question the conmemoration efforts made in 1929 under the sponsorship of the Colonial Dames of America, an association dedicated to honoring the memory of the very agents involved in the destruction and disposession of the indigenous populations the marker they installed supposedly conmemorates. Finally, I discuss the displacement of this marker in 2014 by the Missouri Department of Transportation in connection with the construction of the Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge. I argue that successive efforts to conmemorate the monument, as well as other indigenous sites, have operated as a set of settler colonial technologies that contributed to several erasures, eliding the claims of Indigenous populations and constructing an image of these monuments as empty, abandoned ruins through their physical and conceptual un-making.

Speaker bio:

Ana María León is an architect and a historian of objects, buildings, and landscapes. Her work studies how spatial practices of power and resistance shape the modernity of the Americas. She is co-founder of several collectives laboring to broaden the reach of architectural history including the Feminist Art and Architecture Collaborative (where she was active 2013–2020), Detroit Resists, Nuestro Norte es el Sur, and the Settler Colonial City Project. She recently published her first book, titled Modernity for the Masses: Antonio Bonet’s Dreams for Buenos Aires (University of Texas Press, 2021). León teaches at the University of Michigan where she co-directs the Decolonizing Pedagogies Workshop.

Zoom link: https://uoregon.zoom.us/j/96436404229

May 6
Oscar Gandy: “Algorithmic Manipulation: How Shall We Respond to the Threats and Challenges Before Us?”noon

Oscar H. Gandy Jr. is Herbert I. Schiller Professor Emeritus in the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. Gandy is an...
May 6 noon–1:00 p.m.

Oscar H. Gandy Jr. is Herbert I. Schiller Professor Emeritus in the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. Gandy is an internationally-recognized scholar in the political economy of information and communication, whose work focuses on information subsidies and policy formation, race, privacy and surveillance, discrimination, and media framing and effects. 

Free registration required.

 

Series Overview

What is Communication? (2021) will investigate instantiations and permutations of communication via models of exchange, modes of inquiry, and meanings of community. While communication has been conceptualized as models of transportation, transmission, and ritual communication is also characterized by modes of sharing, imparting, connecting, and participating. These characteristics can contribute to democracy, as well as facilitating the commons and community/fellowship. This year marks the sixth collaboration with scholars from the natural sciences, social sciences and arts.

Please see whatis.uoregon.edu for more details and other featured keynotes.

The What is…? Speaker Series is sponsored by the Knight Chair in Communication Research, UO Women in Graduate Science, the Oregon Humanities Center, New Media and Culture Program, and the Department of Philosophy. Additional gratitude to our supporters.

May 19
Waiting Time: Ambient Anxiety in Sun and Sea (Marina)noon

Heather Davis, The New School, “Waiting Time: Ambient Anxiety in Sun & Sea (Marina)” In 1948, Hermann Muller coined the term ‘time bomb’ to...
May 19 noon

Heather Davis, The New School, “Waiting Time: Ambient Anxiety in Sun & Sea (Marina)”


In 1948, Hermann Muller coined the term ‘time bomb’ to describe chemical and nuclear fallout that kills ‘more in the future’ than when the bomb explodes. This metaphor could be aptly applied to the implications of climate change and petrochemical saturation. Exploring the various relations of time to fossil fuels, this talk will examine how time is not what it once was. Seasons happen at the wrong time; species are going extinct at an unprecedented rate. The sense of dormancy, where the amplification and feedback loops of climate change, although already past, still remain in the future, was saliently illustrated in the opera Sun & Sea (Marina) that won the Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale in 2019. The opera is about a day at the beach that depicts the ambient, but mounting, anxieties that inundate the subjective time of climate change.

Zoom LInk:

https://NewSchool.zoom.us/j/95142737165?pwd=dmFnTnlUQmRKaSt5alJKbCt2VXptdz09
Password: 441472

 

May 27
Mario Ybarra Jr.: “I Did It for Revenge!” George and Matilda Fowler Lecture5:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series  Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research The event is free and open to the public and live on...
May 27 5:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series 
Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research

The event is free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here. The lecture will also live stream on the Department of Art Facebook.

Mario Ybarra Jr. will discuss some of his past projects and discuss the important role of the individual and collaborative artist in relationship to creating and in finding ways to tell one's family's stories and other marginalized narratives that have guided his artistic practice. He will engage audiences in creative strategies/tools for thinking and making Art.

Mario Ybarra Jr., is a visual and performance artist, educator, and activist who combines street culture with fine art in order to produce what he calls “contemporary art that is filtered through a Mexican-American experience in Los Angeles.”  His work has been included in many group exhibitions, including Installations Inside/Out: Armory 20th Anniversary Exhibition, Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena, California; San Juan Poly/Graphic Triennial of the Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña, San Juan, Puerto Rico; Phantom Sightings: Art After the Chicano Movement, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, California; and Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York (2008). He is co-founder of an artist run organization located in the Harbor area of Los Angeles, called Slanguage Studio (2002-present). 

Made possible by the George and Matilda Fowler Endowment Fund.

 

 

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