Events

silhouette of adult and child looking at art projected on walls

Events

There is always something happening in the College of Design. Join us for art exhibits, guest lectures, conferences, and research symposia. Most of these are free and open to the public. You can join our email list to receive our Upcoming Events weekly announcement and stay in the know about the latest happenings.

Jan 22
"User's Guide" - LaVerne Krause Gallery Exhibit10:00 a.m.

New work by MFA's Claire Anderson, Eden V. Evans, Stephanie Parnes, Tannon Reckling, and Kevin Yatsu.   Claire Anderson: My work strives to create a space that...
January 21–25
Lawrence Hall, LaVerne Krause Gallery, Room 101

New work by MFA's Claire Anderson, Eden V. Evans, Stephanie Parnes, Tannon Reckling, and Kevin Yatsu.

 

Claire Anderson:

My work strives to create a space that is empty of conclusion and uses the potential of a material to equalize the identities and conditions of all objects. Our desire to find familiarity and connections is tested by a lack of singular language towards an ambiguous thing. 

 

Eden V. Evans:

Evans’ work explores materiality, process, and collaboration in an attempt to subtly navigate the space between playfulness and seriousness. Craft vernaculars, child-like science, earth-based elements, and material studies lead to investigations of light, darkness, and the unknown through the lens of mortality and discussions of what we leave behind.”

 

Stephanie Parnes:

"Uncertainty lies at the root of my practice, which straddles sculpture, drawing, and photography. I engage in iterative processes of finding, collecting, arranging and rearranging objects into speculative arrangements that probe contingent relationships and enact an ongoing restlessness and internal conflict."

 

Tannon Reckling:

Reckling's 3d work explores communication, documentation, and contact with a recent queer family member who was removed from his family's history. Using a major weight loss as subject, Reckling examines dysphoria, class, abreaction, and electronic catharsis.

 

Kevin Yatsu:

Yatsu's work is situated within the hyper€uidity of the internet landscape. He uses appropriation to coax forward the lexicon by which internet users operate and uses form as a means to create sympathetic structures for his Japanese-American identity."

Jan 24
Department of Art Visiting Artist Lecture Series- Megan Foster4:00 p.m.

Megan Foster: “Illuminating” Megan Foster’s work suggests a narrative by presenting a frozen moment in time. She aims to preserve and give authority to...
January 24 4:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, Room 115

Megan Foster: “Illuminating”

Megan Foster’s work suggests a narrative by presenting a frozen moment in time. She aims to preserve and give authority to the everyday experience through a mix of art, architecture, design and science. Using appropriated images, film stills, magazine clippings and staged photographs as a starting point, she depicts banal scenes that have the potential to be spectacular and fantastic. She portrays often-overinflated expectations of the way we live and how we try to better ourselves from previous generations.

Megan Foster earned her BFA from RISD and her MFA from Columbia University. Her work has been included in exhibitions at Black and White Gallery, Brooklyn, NY; Mixed Greens Gallery, NYC; PS1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City, NY; Inside-Out Art Museum, Beijing, China; and the San Jose Museum of Art, San Jose, CA, among other venues. Before joining the faculty at RISD in the fall of 2016, Foster taught at The City College of New York where she was the head of Printmaking and director of the MFA program. She was also master printer at the LeRoy Neiman Center for Print Studies and is the co-founder of Moonlight Editions.

Jan 24
Closing Reception: "User's Guide" - LaVerne Krause Gallery Exhibit5:00 p.m.

New work by MFA's Claire Anderson, Eden V. Evans, Stephanie Parnes, Tannon Reckling, and Kevin Yatsu.   Claire Anderson: My work strives to create a space that...
January 24 5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, LaVerne Krause Gallery, Room 101

New work by MFA's Claire Anderson, Eden V. Evans, Stephanie Parnes, Tannon Reckling, and Kevin Yatsu.

 

Claire Anderson:

My work strives to create a space that is empty of conclusion and uses the potential of a material to equalize the identities and conditions of all objects. Our desire to find familiarity and connections is tested by a lack of singular language towards an ambiguous thing. 

 

Eden V. Evans:

Evans’ work explores materiality, process, and collaboration in an attempt to subtly navigate the space between playfulness and seriousness. Craft vernaculars, child-like science, earth-based elements, and material studies lead to investigations of light, darkness, and the unknown through the lens of mortality and discussions of what we leave behind.”

 

Stephanie Parnes:

"Uncertainty lies at the root of my practice, which straddles sculpture, drawing, and photography. I engage in iterative processes of finding, collecting, arranging and rearranging objects into speculative arrangements that probe contingent relationships and enact an ongoing restlessness and internal conflict."

 

Tannon Reckling:

Reckling's 3d work explores communication, documentation, and contact with a recent queer family member who was removed from his family's history. Using a major weight loss as subject, Reckling examines dysphoria, class, abreaction, and electronic catharsis.

 

Kevin Yatsu:

Yatsu's work is situated within the hyper€uidity of the internet landscape. He uses appropriation to coax forward the lexicon by which internet users operate and uses form as a means to create sympathetic structures for his Japanese-American identity."

Jan 31
WHAT’S MISSING in the College of Design?3:30 p.m.

“WHAT’S MISSING in the College of Design?” a series of discussions around intersectionality, inclusion, diversity, justice, and equity in the College of...
January 31 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, Room 198, Dean's Office

“WHAT’S MISSING in the College of Design?”

a series of discussions around intersectionality, inclusion, diversity, justice, and equity in the College of Design

All College of Design students, faculty, and staff are welcome!


January 31 discussion topic: WOMEN IN DESIGN

3:30–3:45 p.m. Gathering, socializing

3:45–4:00 p.m. Welcome from Dean Christoph Lindner

and a summary of issues discussed at the fall term “What’s Missing” gathering from Associate Dean Liska Chan

4:00–4:45 p.m. group discussion about women in design

4:45–5:30 p.m. casual conversation/refreshments

In November we discussed issues and concerns around feelings of being welcomed to and in the College. We discussed barriers to diversity such as finances and socio-economics, identity, isolation, college/campus divide, etc. We discussed topics that people feel are important to share in-depth, such as building bridges to the UO Multicultural Center and CoDaC (Center on Diversity and Community), making graduate school accessible to people of color, bridging majors to create more interdisciplinary work, mental health inclusion, etc.

Our topic this term is “WOMEN IN DESIGN”.  With so many issues emerging lately in the news regarding barriers to professional growth and success for women--understanding this word intersectionally--in design, this discussion will center on how those issues manifest and ways they can possibly be addressed in the UO College of Design.

Feb 1
Live reading of The Best We Could Do with Thi Bui11:00 a.m.

Join Thi Bui in an interactive reading of an excerpt from her illustrated memoir The Best We Could Do, the 2018-2019 UO Common Reading selection. Some audience participation will...
February 1 11:00 a.m.–noon
Prince Lucien Campbell Hall (PLC), Room 180

Join Thi Bui in an interactive reading of an excerpt from her illustrated memoir The Best We Could Do, the 2018-2019 UO Common Reading selection. Some audience participation will be needed. Q&A with the author will follow. This reading compliments the exhibition of some of Thi Bui's original panels for the book found in the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art exhibition, "Reframing the Fragments: The Best We Could Do."

Feb 7
Department of Art Visiting Artist Lecture Series- Whitney Hubbs4:00 p.m.

Whitney Hubbs: “Trials, Errors, and Some Successes!” With a 20-year history of picture making, Whitney Hubbs explores both straightforward and uncertain...
February 7 4:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, 115

Whitney Hubbs: “Trials, Errors, and Some Successes!”

With a 20-year history of picture making, Whitney Hubbs explores both straightforward and uncertain modes of image production. Educated as a traditional documentary photographer and as a conceptual artist examining the role of photographs, Hubbs brings a rigorous approach to her work. Her subject matter has included staged poems to the landscape, the figure in the landscape, self-portraits, and literal and abstract examinations of the female body.

Born and raised in Southern California with a brief stint in Portland, Oregon, Whitney Hubbs was involved in the punk rock riot grrrl community from a young age, where she made fanzines, organized art shows, participated in performances and worked as an activist. She later received her BFA from the California College of Arts in 2005 and an MFA at UCLA in 2009. Hubbs has participated in group exhibitions at The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gallery Luisotti, and Shulamit Nazarian Gallery in Los Angeles, CA; The California Museum of Photography, Riverside, CA; Ballroom Marfa, Marfa, TX; Yancey Richardson Gallery, Fresh Window Gallery, and Situations Gallery in New York City, NY. Her book, Body Doubles, was published by Hesse Press (Los Angeles) in 2016, and in 2019 she will publish a book with Self Publish Be Happy. Hubbs is represented by M+B Gallery in Los Angeles and Situations Gallery in New York City. Hubbs is an Assistant Professor of Photography at Alfred University, Alfred, New York and lives and works in New York State.

Feb 9
Visual Magic Gallery Tour: Color and Abstraction2:00 p.m.

George D. Green, Sandy Brooke, and others discuss their paintings on view in Visual Magic: An Oregon Invitational and their approaches to color and abstraction. 
February 9 2:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

George D. Green, Sandy Brooke, and others discuss their paintings on view in Visual Magic: An Oregon Invitational and their approaches to color and abstraction. 

Feb 12
NEH Application Writing Workshop3:00 p.m.

The Oregon Humanities Center and the Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation are pleased to host a workshop on developing competitive proposals for the National...
February 12 3:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Crater Lake Room

The Oregon Humanities Center and the Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation are pleased to host a workshop on developing competitive proposals for the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Dr. Daniel Sack, Senior Program Officer in the Division of Research Programs, will provide an overview of NEH programs and initiatives, offer strategies for application writing, and facilitate a mock peer review panel session. NEH is an independent grant-making agency of the United States government dedicated to supporting research, education, preservation, and public programs in the humanities.

Registration for the workshop is required: bit.ly/2QZ3hCl. The event is free and open to humanities scholars, faculty, and administrators throughout the region.

Dr. Sack will host individual appointments with faculty members to discuss their research proposals. Faculty are encouraged, but not required, to bring a white paper or working draft of a proposal. Appointments can be scheduled at: bit.ly/2QZ3hCl (available on a first-come, first-served basis).

Feb 13
Schnitzer Cinema: AIFF Best of Fests: ”Mr. Fish: Cartooning from the Deep End" with guest cartoonist Mr. Fish via Skype7:00 p.m.

Mr. Fish and his cartoons and animations are brilliant, timely, and important. Once upon a time, such compelling work was a vital part of American journalism. But what's...
February 13 7:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Mr. Fish and his cartoons and animations are brilliant, timely, and important. Once upon a time, such compelling work was a vital part of American journalism. But what's happened to editorial cartoons and cartoonists over the last few years is chilling, as the daily newspapers that used to publish them are rapidly disappearing. This incisive documentary introduces us to an artist who should be far better known than he is. He opens our eyes to the hypocrisy of all political sides with his outrageous, taboo-breaking art. Mr. Fish struggles to stay true to his creativity in a world where biting satiric humor has an ever-diminishing commercial value. Ultimately, he must come to terms with the kinds of compromises a radical artist makes (or refuses to make) while also trying to raise children and pay the mortgage. (Documentary, Pablo Bryant, 70 min.) 

The Schnitzer Cinema series is programmed by Richard Herskowitz, JSMA curator of media arts and Artist Director of the Ashland Independent Film Festival. All programs are free, with popcorn and refreshments provided!

Feb 14
College of Design Recruitment Fair11:00 a.m.

Free annual Job and Internship recruitment event, representing a range of careers in interior architecture, architecture, landscape architecture, planning, construction,...
February 14 11:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, 1st and 2nd floors

Free annual Job and Internship recruitment event, representing a range of careers in interior architecture, architecture, landscape architecture, planning, construction, engineering, and consulting.

Feb 14
Department of Art Visiting Artist Lecture Series- Amy Franceschini4:00 p.m.

Amy Franceschini: “Provisions… for Situations Yet to Come” In this lecture, Amy Franceschini will present the work of Futurefarmers, an...
February 14 4:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, 115

Amy Franceschini: “Provisions… for Situations Yet to Come”

In this lecture, Amy Franceschini will present the work of Futurefarmers, an international group of artists, activists, farmers and architects with a common interest in creating frameworks of participation that recalibrate our cultural compass. She will discuss how their work uses various media to enact situations that disassemble habitual apparatus. Through public art, architecture, museum installations, publications and temporary educational programs inside institutions, they have transformed public policy, urban planning, educational curricula and public transportation plans. Futurefarmers’ work often creates relational sculptures and tools for audiences to gain insight into deeper fields of inquiry- not only to imagine, but also to participate in and initiate change in the places we live.

Amy Franceschini (b. 1970 Patterson, CA, US) lives and works in San Francisco and Gent, Belgium and is the founder of Futurefarmers. Amy received her BFA from San Francisco State University in 1992 and her MFA from Stanford University in 2002. Amy has taught as an adjunct and visiting professor in the graduate programs in art at California College for the Arts, Stanford University and San Francisco Art Institute since 2003. Her work has been exhibited at the Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Whitney Biennial in New York, MOMA, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, The Canadian Center for Architecture in Montreal, the 2014 Venice Architectural Biennale, the 2017 Sharjah Biennale, the 2018 Taipei Biennale and she is the recipient of a 2010 Guggenheim Fellowship, 2017 Herb Alpert Award for Visual Arts and a 2019 Rome Prize Fellow in Design. 

This lecture is made possible in part by the Departments of Art, English/Moore Fund, and Landscape Architecture.

 

Feb 15
School of Architecture and Environment Graduate Programs Virtual Info Session9:15 a.m.

Virtual information session to provide further details on the Graduate Programs within the School of Architecture and Environment (Historic Preservation, Interior Architecture,...
February 15 9:15 a.m.–11:15 a.m.

Virtual information session to provide further details on the Graduate Programs within the School of Architecture and Environment (Historic Preservation, Interior Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Architecture).

Please register here: Information Session Registration

Once individuals have registered, a link to the virtual session will be sent out as a confirmation a couple of days before the event.

For futher information, please contact, Jessica Wu at jwu21@uoregon.edu.

Feb 16
Exhibition tour with Peter Yenne2:00 p.m.

Exhibition tour with co-curator Peter Yenne of Qosqo, entre el pasado y el presente: Photography in Cusco 1895 - 1945. 
February 16 2:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Exhibition tour with co-curator Peter Yenne of Qosqo, entre el pasado y el presente: Photography in Cusco 1895 - 1945. 

Feb 28
Books by Design with Jenny Youngnoon

Join us in the Design Library (200 Lawrence Hall) on Thursday 11/29 at noon for a brown bag talk with Jenny Young, co-author of the book Making Places for People: 12...
February 28 noon–1:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, Room 200 - Design Library

Join us in the Design Library (200 Lawrence Hall) on Thursday 11/29 at noon for a brown bag talk with Jenny Young, co-author of the book Making Places for People: 12 Questions Every Designer Should Ask. The book explores social questions in environmental design and argues that understanding the relationships between people and their built environments can inspire designs that better contribute to health, human performance, and social equity.

Jenny Young is an architect and professor of architecture in the School of Architecture and Environment.

Mar 2
Visual Magic Gallery Tour: Landscape and Environment2:00 p.m.

Robert Dozono, Sandra Roumagoux, and Richard Thompson discuss their paintings on view and how they respond to landscape and the environment in their work. 
March 2 2:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Robert Dozono, Sandra Roumagoux, and Richard Thompson discuss their paintings on view and how they respond to landscape and the environment in their work. 

Mar 4
"Drywall" - LaVerne Krause Gallery Exhibit10:00 a.m.

Is there a place in our minds where we feel trapped? Are we trapped by ourselves or someone else? Do we confuse the two? Is a home a physical place or a place in our minds or...
March 4–8
Lawrence Hall, LaVerne Krause Gallery, Room 101

Is there a place in our minds where we feel trapped? Are we trapped by ourselves or someone else? Do we confuse the two? Is a home a physical place or a place in our minds or somewhere in between? Like rituals we do at home, are there rituals in our minds that we are devoted to?

 

Analee Ackerman

Meg Arnold

Desi Colley

Mark Drevdahl

Brad Hodgin

Ariel Lenkov

Allison Schukis

Sam Wrigglesworth

 

 

 

Mar 7
Department of Art Visiting Artist Lecture Series- Shadi Harouni4:00 p.m.

Shadi Harouni: “Of Myth and Monument” Shadi Harouni will consider the metaphysics of hope alive in contested bodies, forbidden objects and forgotten histories....
March 7 4:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, 115

Shadi Harouni: “Of Myth and Monument”

Shadi Harouni will consider the metaphysics of hope alive in contested bodies, forbidden objects and forgotten histories. Her lecture looks at mountain and monument, both erected and imagined, as sites of humor and resistance, forgetting and despair. She will discuss the development of her practice and recent completed, ongoing and failed projects. 

Shadi Harouni is an artist based in New York and Tehran. Harouni's practice ranges from site-specific interventions and sculptures, to printmaking, photography and film. Her research is centered on disavowed and marginalized histories of dissent and resistance, chiefly in the Middle East. Harouni’s projects have been exhibited at Queens Museum (NY), Kunstmuseum Bonn (DE), Prague City Gallery (CZ), University of Toronto (CA), Fondazione Ratti (IT), Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts (NY). Her work has been featured in Art Forum, The New York Times, The Guardian, Flash Art and Mousse, among others. She has been awarded a Gattuso Prize for Outstanding Exhibition, Harpo Foundation Grant for Artists, AIR Fellowship, residencies at Skowhegan (ME), SOMA (MX), LES Printshop (NY). Harouni holds an MFA from NYU (2011) and a BA from University of Southern California (2007). She serves as Visiting Assistant Professor and Director of the Undergraduate Program in Studio Art at New York University, Steinhardt.

Mar 7
Closing Reception: "Drywall" - LaVerne Krause Gallery Exhibit5:00 p.m.

Is there a place in our minds where we feel trapped? Are we trapped by ourselves or someone else? Do we confuse the two? Is a home a physical place or a place in our minds or...
March 7 5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, LaVerne Krause Gallery, Room 101

Is there a place in our minds where we feel trapped? Are we trapped by ourselves or someone else? Do we confuse the two? Is a home a physical place or a place in our minds or somewhere in between? Like rituals we do at home, are there rituals in our minds that we are devoted to?

 

Analee Ackerman

Meg Arnold

Desi Colley

Mark Drevdahl

Brad Hodgin

Ariel Lenkov

Allison Schukis

Sam Wrigglesworth

Mar 13
Schnitzer Cinema: AIFF The Best of Fests: ”The Gospel of Eureka" with guest director Michael Palmieri7:00 p.m.

Love, faith and civil rights collide in a southern town as evangelical Christians and drag queens step into the spotlight to dismantle stereotypes. Taking a personal, and often...
March 13 7:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Love, faith and civil rights collide in a southern town as evangelical Christians and drag queens step into the spotlight to dismantle stereotypes. Taking a personal, and often comical look at negotiating differences between religion and belief through performance, political action, and partnership, gospel drag shows and passion plays set the stage for one hell of a show. "Without condescension, we hope to show that what is crass, campy, or even profane in the eyes of one group is sacred and full of communal significance in the eyes of another" (Donal Mosher and Michael Palmieri). Narrated by Mx Justin Vivian Bond and called "an act of formal and spiritual resurrection" by Eric Hynes (Film Comment). (Documentary, D: Donal Mosher and Micahel Palmieri, 75 min.)

The Schnitzer Cinema series is programmed by Richard Herskowitz, JSMA curator of media arts and Artist Director of the Ashland Independent Film Festival. All programs are free, with popcorn and refreshments provided!

Mar 14
Student Presentations 5:00 p.m.

Interior Architecture students from instructor Tom Bonamici's Furniture Design course (IARC 486/586) will present furniture made in response to objects from the Margo Grant...
March 14 5:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Interior Architecture students from instructor Tom Bonamici's Furniture Design course (IARC 486/586) will present furniture made in response to objects from the Margo Grant Walsh Collection of Silver and Metalwork at the JSMA.

Apr 3
Curator's Lecture: Visual Magic: The Oregon Connection5:30 p.m.

Danielle Knapp, JSMA McCosh curator discusses the group of artists invited to participate in Visual Magic: An Oregon Invitational and their education and activities in...
April 3 5:30 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Danielle Knapp, JSMA McCosh curator discusses the group of artists invited to participate in Visual Magic: An Oregon Invitational and their education and activities in Oregon in the 1960s and ‘70s.

Apr 5
"Aesthetics of Gentrification" SLOWLAB Conference9:00 a.m.

Aesthetics of Gentrification: Art, Architecture, and Displacement International Conference UO Portland, April 5-6, 2019 Organized by SLOW LAB, this interdisciplinary...
April 5 9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
White Stag Block, TBD

Aesthetics of Gentrification: Art, Architecture, and Displacement

International Conference
UO Portland, April 5-6, 2019

Organized by SLOW LAB, this interdisciplinary conference at UO Portland’s historic White Stag Block brings together scholars from across the humanities, social sciences, and art and design fields to explore the aesthetic dimensions of gentrification in the present era of accelerated urbanism.

Gentrification is reshaping cities worldwide, resulting in seductive spaces and exclusive communities that aspire to innovation, creativity, sustainability, and technological sophistication. Gentrification is also contributing to growing social-spatial division and urban inequality and precarity. In a time of escalating housing crisis and unaffordable cities, scholars speak of eco-gentrification, techno-gentrification, super-gentrification, and planetary-gentrification to describe the different forms and scales of involuntary displacement occurring in vulnerable communities in response to current patterns of development and the hype-driven discourses of the creative city, smart city, and sustainable city.

In this context, how do contemporary practices in art, architecture, and related fields help to produce or resist gentrification? What does gentrification look and feel like in specific sites and communities, and how is that appearance or feeling implicated in promoting stylized renewal to a privileged public? To what extent do the aesthetics of displacement travel globally between cities and cultures? And in what ways do those aesthetics express contested conditions of migration and mobility? Addressing such questions, this conference seeks to examine the relationship between aesthetics and gentrification in contemporary cities from multiple, comparative, and transnational perspectives.

Apr 11
Curator's Lecture: Visual Clave: The Expression of the Latino/a Experience through Album Cover Art: 1940 - 903:30 p.m.

Co-presented with the CLLAS Spring 2019 Research Presentation Series. 
April 11 3:30 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Co-presented with the CLLAS Spring 2019 Research Presentation Series. 

Apr 17
Jean-Michel Basquiat's Masonic Lodge: Anatomy of the Soul5:30 p.m.

Fred Hoffman worked closely with Jean-Michel Basquiat from 1982 to 1984, during the artist's residency in Venice, California. During this time, Hoffman produced most of the...
April 17 5:30 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Fred Hoffman worked closely with Jean-Michel Basquiat from 1982 to 1984, during the artist's residency in Venice, California. During this time, Hoffman produced most of the artist's limited edition silkscreen prints. In 2005-6, Fred Hoffman co-curated the artist's last American retrospective at The Brooklyn Museum; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; and the Houston Museum of Fine Art. Hoffman served as a member of the Authentication Committee for the estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat for several years. In 2014, he published Jean-Michel Basquiat Drawing in conjunction with the exhibition of the same name at Acquavella Gallery, New York. In 2017, Hoffman published The Art of Jean-Michel Basquiat. 

As a gallerist in the 1980s and '90s, Hoffman organized major exhibitions with such artists as Basquiat, Richard Serra, Frank O. Gehry, Chris Burden, John McCracken, Robert Rauschenberg, Tom Wesselmann, George Segal, Alex Katz, Dan Flavian, Cindy Sherman, Jenny Holzer, Sophie Calle, Barbara Kruger, Dennis Hopper, Julian Schnabel, Don Van Vliet and James Lee Byars. 

Fred Hoffman (Ph.D. 1976, UCLA) is the author of several publications, including the major monograph/catalogue raissoné on Chris Burden; Keith Haring, The Birth of Wonder; Thoughts on the Return and Artistic Maturation of Dennis Hopper and The Art of Don Van Vliet. Hoffman produced two early artist books with Mike Kelley. 

Apr 18
Lecture by Jorge Coronado5:30 p.m.

Coronado is a professor of Spanish and Portuguese at Northwestern University and author of Portraits in the Andes: Photography and Agency 1900 - 1950. 
April 18 5:30 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Coronado is a professor of Spanish and Portuguese at Northwestern University and author of Portraits in the Andes: Photography and Agency 1900 - 1950. 

May 4
Visual Magic Gallery Tour: The Human Figure2:00 p.m.

Jeri Hise, Connie Kiener, and Laura Ross-Paul discuss their paintings on view and how they approach the human figure in their work. 
May 4 2:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Jeri Hise, Connie Kiener, and Laura Ross-Paul discuss their paintings on view and how they approach the human figure in their work. 

All Upcoming Events