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A unique academic ecosystem, the College of Design comprises not only creative practitioners—artists, architects, and designers—but also social scientists, humanities scholars, engineers, economists, biologists, planners, and policy makers. Using diverse methods, we are engaging critical questions and tackling complex problems.

people looking at glacier
Research Spotlight

A Brighter Future

The newly launched UO Pacific Northwest Just Futures Institute for Racial and Climate Justice was made possible by a historic $4.52 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Directed by School of Planning, Public Policy and Management Assistant Professor John Arroyo, leaders in the College of Design are joining forces with the College of Arts and Sciences, and community-based partners, to do the deep, meaningful, and urgent equity work that will envision and realize a just future for the Pacific Northwest.

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Ecology

We tackle urgent ecological challenges through many lenses. Revealing, understanding, caring for, and reviving vibrant ecosystems and a healthy environment for all species is a deep vein running through our work.

Speculation

We are dynamic explorers with diverse tools. Through imagination, experimentation, analysis, and creation, we grapple with thorny problems, discover new interpretations, and open uncharted territory.

Justice

We are dedicated to building a more just and inclusive future. Anti-racist actions and social equity questions are embedded in what we do—engaging civic life, shaping the built environment, and creating new imaginaries.

Wonder

We ask bold questions and make unexpected connections, aiming to engage, enrich, and inspire through the things we make and the stories we tell. Catalyzing curiosity, awe, and empathy opens new potentials.

Map Your Future

Whether creating in the studio, doing fieldwork and internships or studying objects at the museum, College of Design students are learning hands on and working directly with faculty.

Explore the College of Design to discover what makes our places, people, and programs so special.

Explore Design


Social Connections


Events

September 2022

Sep 28
"Only in Dreams" 9:00 a.m.

Where slugs convene in an orgy of reflective chrome. Where a concrete dome carries you across the ocean. Where a surfboard becomes stone, then falls to liquid. Where the floor...
"Only in Dreams"
September 28–October 6
9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall LaVerne Krause Gallery

Where slugs convene in an orgy of reflective chrome. Where a concrete dome carries you across the ocean. Where a surfboard becomes stone, then falls to liquid. Where the floor you’ve been staring at all your life becomes a wall. Where metal returns to clay, and clay to metal. Where a technicolor table offers up the biggest worm you’ve ever seen.

Where the veil between sleeping and waking becomes a space of its own.

 

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2nd Year MFA Exhibition Featuring work by: Christian Alvarado, Ashley Campbell, Conner Gordon, Sydney Lee, Ellen O'Shea, and Noa Taylor.

Sep 28
Many Wests: Artists Shape an American Idea 11:00 a.m.

Ideas about the American West, both in popular culture and in commonly accepted historical narratives, are often based on a past that never was, and fail to take into account...
Many Wests: Artists Shape an American Idea
September 28–December 18
11:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon

Ideas about the American West, both in popular culture and in commonly accepted historical narratives, are often based on a past that never was, and fail to take into account important events that actually occurred. The exhibition Many Wests: Artists Shape an American Idea examines the perspectives of 48 modern and contemporary artists who offer a broader an d more inclusive view of this region, which too often has been dominated by romanticized myths and Euro-American historical accounts.

Featuring artwork from the permanent collections of the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) and four partner museums in the western region of the United States, Many Wests is the culmination of a multi-year, joint curatoria initiative made possible by the Art Bridges Foundation. Along with JSMA, the SAAM’s collaborating partners include the Boise Art Museum (Boise, Idaho); the Utah Museum of Fine Arts (Salt Lake City, Utah); and the Whatcom Museum (Bellingham, Washington).

This exhibition presents an opportunity to examine previous misconceptions, question racist clichés, and highlight the multiple communities and histories that continue to form this iconic region of the United States. Working in various media, from painting and sculpture to photography and mixed media, the artists featured bring a nuanced and multifaceted history to light. Many Wests highlights many voices, especially those of artists who identify as Black, Indigenous, Asian American, Latinx, and LGBTQ+. In Many Wests, JSMA is pleased to share works by Rick Bartow (Wiyot), Ka’ila Farrell-Smith (Klamath Modoc), V. Maldonado, Rubén Trejo, and Marie Watt (Seneca) from the permanent collection. The modern and contemporary artists featured in this exhibition reveal that “the West” has always been a place of multiple stories, experiences, and cultures. 

This exhibition is organized by Amy Chaloupka, curator of art at the Whatcom Museum; Melanie Fales, executive director/CEO of the Boise Art Museum; Danielle Knapp, McCosh Curator at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art; Whitney Tassie, senior curator and curator of modern and contemporary art at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts; and E. Carmen Ramos, former curator of Latinx Art, and Art Bridges Initiative Project Director, with Anne Hyland, the Art Bridges Initiative curatorial coordinator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

This is one in a series of American art exhibitions created through a multi-year, multi-institutional partnership formed by the Smithsonian American Art Museum as part of the Art Bridges Initiative.

October 2022

Oct 4
"Only in Dreams" - Reception 5:00 p.m.

Where slugs convene in an orgy of reflective chrome. Where a concrete dome carries you across the ocean. Where a surfboard becomes stone, then falls to liquid. Where the floor...
"Only in Dreams" - Reception
October 4
5:00–6:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall LaVerne Krause Gallery

Where slugs convene in an orgy of reflective chrome. Where a concrete dome carries you across the ocean. Where a surfboard becomes stone, then falls to liquid. Where the floor you’ve been staring at all your life becomes a wall. Where metal returns to clay, and clay to metal. Where a technicolor table offers up the biggest worm you’ve ever seen.

Where the veil between sleeping and waking becomes a space of its own.

///

 

2nd Year MFA Exhibition featuring artwork by Christian Alvarado, Ashley Campbell, Conner Gordon, Sydney Lee, Ellen O'Shea, and Noa Taylor.

Oct 11
Natasha Ginwala, Critical Conversations Lecture 4:00 p.m.

University of Oregon Visiting Artist Lecture Series Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research Natasha Ginwala is Associate Curator at...
Natasha Ginwala, Critical Conversations Lecture
October 11
4:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall 115

University of Oregon Visiting Artist Lecture Series Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research

Natasha Ginwala is Associate Curator at Large at Gropius Bau, Berlin; Artistic Director of Colomboscope in Sri Lanka and the 13th Gwangju Biennale with Defne Ayas (2021). Ginwala has curated Contour Biennale 8, Polyphonic Worlds: Justice as Medium and was part of the curatorial team of documenta 14, 2017. Other projects include Indigo Waves and Other Stories: Re-navigating the Afrasian Sea and Notions of Diaspora (with Bonaventure Soh Bejeng Ndikung and Michelangelo Corsaro) at Zeitz MOCAA; Survey exhibitions of Bani Abidi, Akinbode Akinbiyi and Zanele Muholi at Gropius Bau. Ginwala was a member of the artistic team for the 8th Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art, 2014, and has co-curated The Museum of Rhythm, at Taipei Biennial 2012 and at  Muzeum Sztuki, Lodz, 2016–17. Ginwala writes regularly on contemporary art and visual culture.

This lecture is made possible by Critical Conversations.

Lectures are also live streamed and archived on YouTube.

Oct 13
Carmen Winant: “Notes on Fundamental Joy” 4:00 p.m.

University of Oregon Visiting Artist Lecture Series Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research Carmen Winant’s lecture will animate the ongoing work...
Carmen Winant: “Notes on Fundamental Joy”
October 13
4:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall 115

University of Oregon Visiting Artist Lecture Series Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research

Carmen Winant’s lecture will animate the ongoing work that she has done in the Oregon Lesbian Land Manuscript Collections in Special Collections since 2018. This research has resulted in a book, “Notes on Fundamental Joy” (Printed Matter Inc., 2019), a series of experimental videos, and a forthcoming exhibition at the Wexner Center of the Arts in Columbus, OH. In sharing her work that has been informed by this substantial and singular archive, Winant will prompt the underlying questions of her practice- What is the fundamental work of world-building? How might we continue to reconfigure the feminist imaginary? What does a world without patriarchy look like? In what ways is optimism a political tool? How might we better understand the relationship between collectivity, survival, and joy? In what ways does photography have the power to continually re-inscribe desire? 

Carmen Winant is an artist and the Roy Lichtenstein Chair of Studio Art at the Ohio State University; her work utilizes installation and collage strategies to examine feminist modes of survival and revolt. Winant's recent projects have been shown at the Museum of Modern Art, Sculpture Center, Wexner Center of the Arts, the Cleveland Museum of Art, The Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo, and as part of the CONTACT Photography Festival, which mounted twenty-six of her billboards across Canada. Forthcoming projects will take place at The Print Center (Philadelphia), ICA Boston, and Minneapolis Institute of Art. Winant's recent artist’s books include My Birth (2018), Notes on Fundamental Joy (2019), and Instructional Photography: Learning How To Live Now (2021); she is a 2019 Guggenheim Fellow in photography, a 2020 FCA Artist Honoree and a 2021 American Academy of Arts and Letters award recipient. Winant is a mother to her two sons, Carlo and Rafa, whom she shares with her partner Luke Stettner.

This lecture is co-sponsored by UO Libraries. Lectures are also live streamed and archived on YouTube.

Oct 20
Jen Stark: “A Psychedelic Dive into Art, Fractals, and NFTs” 4:00 p.m.

University of Oregon Visiting Artist Lecture Series Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research Jen Stark’s art is driven by her interest in...
Jen Stark: “A Psychedelic Dive into Art, Fractals, and NFTs”
October 20
4:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall 115

University of Oregon Visiting Artist Lecture Series Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research

Jen Stark’s art is driven by her interest in conceptualizing visual systems to simulate plant growth, evolution, infinity, fractals, mimetic topographies, and sacred geometries. Using available materials—paper, wood, metal, paint—Stark strives to make work that balances on a razor’s edge of optical seduction and perceptual engagement. The resulting works are imbued with kinetic, undulating effects that serve to dislocate the viewer from staid reality into an immersive ecosphere of echoing patterns and designs found in nature. In recent years, Stark has introduced new technologies into her diverse practice, delving into the digital realm of animations, interactive projections, and distinctive NFTs. By adopting cutting-edge techniques to showcase her aesthetic, Stark activates her universe through constant adaptation and transformation.               

Born and raised in Miami, Florida in 1983, Jen Stark now lives and works in Los Angeles. She has been exhibited globally, with major shows in New York, Los Angeles, Miami, Chicago, Thailand, and Canada. Recently included as one of Fortune’s “NFTy 50,” Stark made history in March 2021, as the first female artist to make Foundation’s top 10 highest selling NFT creatives. Her work is held in the collections of institutions such as the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the West Collection, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, NSU Art Museum, and MOCA Miami, among others.

Lectures are also live streamed and archived on YouTube.

Oct 27
Liz Magor: “I Have Wasted My Life” ​​​​​​​George and Matilda Fowler Lecture 4:00 p.m.

University of Oregon Visiting Artist Lecture Series Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research Liz Magor will talk about her recent studio work, how...
Liz Magor: “I Have Wasted My Life” ​​​​​​​George and Matilda Fowler Lecture
October 27
4:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall 115

University of Oregon Visiting Artist Lecture Series Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research

Liz Magor will talk about her recent studio work, how to entertain contradiction, and how to be untopical yet relevant. Magor is a Vancouver-based artist who produces sculptural and photographic works concerned with the latent, affective range of familiar materials, images, and objects. Her process and studio practice were featured in Season 8 of the PBS series Art 21, "Art in the Twenty-first Century" and her work has been exhibited in major international exhibitions such as Documenta VIII, Kassel; the 41st Venice Biennale, and the 4th Biennale of Sydney.  In 2019 Magor presented an exhibition titled BLOWOUT at the Carpenter Center for Visual Art, Cambridge, Mass. The exhibition travelled to the Renaissance Society in Chicago accompanied by a publication.  Recent exhibitions include "Downer" at Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver and "I Have Wasted My Life" at Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York, NY.

This lecture is made possible by the George and Matilda Fowler Endowment Fund. Lectures are also live streamed and archived on YouTube.