Department of the History of Art and Architecture Events

Oct 16
Journey to the Third Dimension: Tom Cramer Drawings and Paintings 1977-201911:00 a.m.

Tom Cramer (American, b. 1960) is widely known for his intricate relief paintings, which celebrate the lushness of nature and the mysteries of the cosmos. This exhibition explores...
August 17–December 29
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Tom Cramer (American, b. 1960) is widely known for his intricate relief paintings, which celebrate the lushness of nature and the mysteries of the cosmos. This exhibition explores his parallel practice in drawing.

Oct 16
Naeemeh Naeemaei: Dreams of Extinction and Under the Earth, Over the Moon 11:00 a.m.

Dissolving the artificial boundary between human society and wild nature is the goal of this special exhibition, featuring work from two of the artist’s recent series,...
June 17–December 31
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Dissolving the artificial boundary between human society and wild nature is the goal of this special exhibition, featuring work from two of the artist’s recent series, "Dreams Before Extinction" and "Under the Earth, Over the Moon."

Oct 16
Saints and Spirits in Early Modern Europe 11:00 a.m.

Saints and Spirits in Early Modern Europe juxtaposes images of distillation and related revelry with representations of saints and the sacred
April 17–November 10
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Saints and Spirits in Early Modern Europe juxtaposes images of distillation and related revelry with representations of saints and the sacred

Oct 16
The Road to Hell is Paved with Works-in-Progress: Writing and Editing for Academic Journals1:00 p.m.

History of Art & Architecture Faculty Colloquium with Keith Eggener, Marion D. Ross Distinguished Professor of Architectural History. Prof. Eggener will describe his...
October 16 1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, Room 241

History of Art & Architecture Faculty Colloquium with Keith Eggener, Marion D. Ross Distinguished Professor of Architectural History.

Prof. Eggener will describe his experience as editor-in-chief of the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians and discuss the submission and editorial process. Q&A to follow. All are welcome.

 

Oct 17
The Politics and Aesthetics of Climate Emergency2:00 p.m.

We’re told we’re in a climate emergency—but whose is it? For Extinction Rebellion, reducing atmospheric carbon is a global urgency; for green neoliberals,...
October 17 2:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, Room 279

We’re told we’re in a climate emergency—but whose is it? For Extinction Rebellion, reducing atmospheric carbon is a global urgency; for green neoliberals, it’s entrepreneurial, a time of economic opportunity; for Indigenous communities, emergency continues centuries of colonial violence and genocide; for authoritarian nationalists, it’s a migration threat best addressed through military security. How might one’s emergency erase or empower another’s? By considering the becoming-activist of aesthetics in relation to both climate mobilizations and the weaponized atmospheres of militarized borderzones (highlighted in the Whitney Museum’s “teargas” biennial and corresponding protests), this presentation considers the complexity of emergency politics, as well as how emergency might give way to the emergence of emancipated futures through intersectionalist social movements.

Speaker bio: T.J. Demos is Professor in the Department of the History of Art and Visual Culture, University of California, Santa Cruz, and Founder and Director of its Center for Creative Ecologies. He writes widely on the intersection of contemporary art, global politics, and ecology, and his essays have appeared in magazines, journals, and catalogues worldwide. His published work centers broadly on the conjunction of art and politics, examining the ability of artistic practice to invent innovative and experimental strategies that challenge dominant social, political, and economic conventions. Among others, his books include: Against the Anthropocene: Visual Culture and Environment Today (Sternberg Press, 2017), Decolonizing Nature: Contemporary Art and the Politics of Ecology (Sternberg Press, 2016), The Migrant Image: The Art and Politics of Documentary during Global Crisis (Duke University Press, 2013), and Return to the Postcolony: Spectres of Colonialism in Contemporary Art (Sternberg Press, 2013). Demos has also curated several exhibitions, including: Rights of Nature: Art and Ecology in the Americas, at Nottingham Contemporary in January 2015; Specters: A Ciné-Politics of Haunting, at the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid in 2014; and Zones of Conflict, at Pratt Manhattan Gallery, New York, in 2008-09. He has served on the Art Journal editorial board (2004-08), and currently sits on the editorial board of Third Text, and on the advisory board of Grey Room.

Sponsored by: The Moore Chair in the English Department, Department of the History of Art and Architecture, Art History Student Association.

Oct 29
How the Arts are Addressing the Climate Crisis - an evening of discussion and performance7:00 p.m.

This event features three short performances (musical, theatrical, and poetic) followed by a roundtable discussion on the role of artists and art in addressing the climate...
October 29 7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center, Room 175

This event features three short performances (musical, theatrical, and poetic) followed by a roundtable discussion on the role of artists and art in addressing the climate emergency and building individual and collective resilience.

Roundtable participants:
Wayne Morse Chair and viola da gamba player Dr. Lucy Jones
painter Naeemeh Naeemaei 
Theresa May (UO Theater Arts)
Emily Scott (UO History of Art and Architecture and Environmental Studies)
John Witte (UO English)

Part of the Wayne Morse Center’s 2019-21 inquiry into Science, Policy and the Public.

Free and open to the public

Oct 30
Retelling the Myth of Princess Bari: Art of Yun Suk Nam1:00 p.m.

History of Art & Architecture Faculty Colloquium Yookyoung Choi, Visiting Assistant Professor of Contemporary Asian Art South Korean artist Yun Suk Nam...
October 30 1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, 241

History of Art & Architecture Faculty Colloquium

Yookyoung Choi, Visiting Assistant Professor of Contemporary Asian Art

South Korean artist Yun Suk Nam (1939- ) expresses her sense of female identity in a series of installations that show a home interior. The work highlights Yun’s consistent interest in the oppressive experiences of women in Korean society and simultaneously reveals the artist’s deep interest in spirituality, Korean shamanism, and the myth of princess Bari.

All are welcome.

Nov 5
Heaven on Earth: Justinian’s Hagia Sophia6:00 p.m.

Robert Ousterhout will present material from his new book, Easter Medieval Architecture: The Building Traditions of Byzantium and Neighboring Lands (2019)
November 5 6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, 115

Robert Ousterhout will present material from his new book, Easter Medieval Architecture: The Building Traditions of Byzantium and Neighboring Lands (2019)

Nov 13
Books by Design with Emily Eliza Scottnoon

History of Art and Architecture professor Emily Eliza Scott will discuss Viscosity:  Mobilizing Materialities, a book she coedited, based on her participation with the...
November 13 noon–1:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, Design Library Room 200

History of Art and Architecture professor Emily Eliza Scott will discuss Viscosity:  Mobilizing Materialities, a book she coedited, based on her participation with the ongoing, collaborative art-research project, World of Matter.

Books by Design is a brown bag series designed to encourage conversation between faculty members and staff working in fields related to the College of Design.

Nov 14
Carved Alive: Tree-Icons in Japan and Arboreal Art History5:30 p.m.

Greg Levine, Professor, Art and Architecture of Japan and Buddhist Visual Cultures, UC Berkeley. What is ecocentric art history? It’s a question that runs up against...
November 14 5:30 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, 166

Greg Levine, Professor, Art and Architecture of Japan and Buddhist Visual Cultures, UC Berkeley.

What is ecocentric art history? It’s a question that runs up against hyper-extraction capitalism and its antidemocratic regimes as they ravage the biosphere and dispossess billions of people of all species—pushing life itself towards catastrophic free fall.

This talk grounds the question of the ecocentric in trees and Buddhas, in “tree-icons.” In such images we find humans, living trees, and image worlds brought into contact in the hard politics of human action upon biota, and in religious, visual-material, and ecological systems. What might such contact suggest for a different art history that thinks and acts in a centerless ecology?

All Upcoming Events »